Nautical Style

Lights and Lanterns

This category includes ship's lights, lanterns or lamps ranging from the most common port and starboard sidelights to masthead lights, not under command lights and anchor lights.

Early lanterns were fueled by lamp oil, and candles, and then later by kerosene. This changed when electricity and the tungsten filament light globe were invented.

Products

 
Anchor Lantern, Hull Steamship Co., SS Palma Boy
SKU: SKU17515

This English made lantern was used aboard the SS Palma Boy, a steamer operated by the Hull Steamship Company. It is a classic, original late 19th Century anchor light.


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Bow Port Sidelight, Alderson & Gyde Ltd.
SKU: SKU17516

Bow port sidelight made by Alderson & Gyde Ltd., Circa 1940's. (2 available)


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Masthead Light, Perko, Early 20th Century
SKU: SKU17522

This masthead light is made of cast brass and has a thick solarised amethyst (sun coloured) glass Fresnel lens. I put the date of manufacture between 1922 and 1930.


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Not Under Command Light, Nippon Sento Co. Ltd.
SKU: SKU17517

Large not under command light, made by Nippon Sento Co. Ltd., Circa 1981.


Price: AUD 485.00
Ship's Daylight Signal Lamp/Searchlight, Circa. 1970
SKU: SKU17549

Large vintage naval signal/searchlight with 20 cm reflector, designed for daytime use, mounted on a custom made, floor standing, varnished timber tripod. Manufactured in October 1970 by Japanese manufacturer Shonan Kosakusho Co. Ltd.

UPDATE: The searchlight has now been rewired and restored to full working order (see detailed description).

Note: Tripod (stand) cannot be shipped interstate or overseas. Take $50 off price.


Price: AUD 2475.00
Starboard Sidelight, Double Lens
SKU: SKU17519

Large double lens starboard sidelight by unknown manufacturer, Circa 1970's


Price: AUD 495.00
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